What Is Primary Myelofibrosis?

What Is Primary Myelofibrosis?

Primary myelofibrosis is a disease in which abnormal blood cells and fibers build up inside the bone marrow.

The bone marrow is made of tissues that make blood cells (red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets) and a web of fibers that support the blood-forming tissues. In primary myelofibrosis (also called chronic idiopathic myelofibrosis), large numbers of blood stem cells become blood cells that do not mature properly (blasts). The web of fibers inside the bone marrow also becomes very thick (like scar tissue) and slows the blood-forming tissue’s ability to make blood cells. This causes the blood-forming tissues to make fewer and fewer blood cells. In order to make up for the low number of blood cells made in the bone marrow, the liver and spleen begin to make the blood cells.

Symptoms of primary myelofibrosis include pain below the ribs on the left side and feeling very tired.

Symptoms of primary myelofibrosis include pain below the ribs on the left side and feeling very tired. Primary myelofibrosis often does not cause early signs or symptoms. It may be found during a routine blood test. Signs and symptoms may be caused by primary myelofibrosis or by other conditions. Check with your doctor if you have any of the following:

  • Feeling pain or fullness below the ribs on the left side
  • Feeling full sooner than normal when eating
  • Feeling very tired
  • Shortness of breath
  • Easy bruising or bleeding
  • Petechiae (flat, red, pinpoint spots under the skin that are caused by bleeding)
  • Fever
  • Drenching night sweats
  • Weight Loss

Primary myelofibrosis is a disease in which abnormal blood cells and fibers build up inside the bone marrow.

Prognosis Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options for primary myelofibrosis. Prognosis depends on the following:

  • The age of the person diagnosed
  • The number of abnormal red blood cells and white blood cells
  • The number of blasts in the blood
  • Whether there are certain changes in the chromosomes
  • Whether the person has signs such as fever, drenching night sweats, or weight loss

Looking for more information on myelofibrosis?

These websites are a good start

CancerCare
cancercare.org

Cancer Support Community
cancersupportcommunity.org

Leukemia & Lymphoma Society
lls.org

MPN Advocacy & Education International
mpnadvocacy.com

MPN Education Foundation
mpninfo.org

MPN Research Foundation
mpnresearchfoundation.org

The MDS Foundation
mds-foundation.org

National Cancer Institute
cancer.gov


Source: National Cancer Institute, cancer.gov

This article was published in Coping® with Cancer magazine, May/June 2022.

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