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Coping with Bladder Cancer

 

Photo by Cancer Type

A diagnosis of bladder cancer can leave you and your loved ones feeling uncertain, anx­ious, and overwhelmed. There are important treatment decisions to make, emotional concerns to manage, and insurance and financial paperwork to organize, among other practical concerns.

It is helpful to keep in mind that there are many sources of information and support for people coping with bladder cancer. By learning about this diagnosis and its treatment options, communicating with your healthcare team, and surround­ing yourself with a support network, you will be better able to manage your blad­der cancer diagnosis and experience a better quality of life.

Understanding Your Diagnosis and Treatment Plan
Bladder cancer occurs when the cells found in the urinary bladder (typically in the innermost lining) begin to change and grow uncontrollably, forming a tumor (also called a nodule), which can be either cancerous or benign.

About 95 percent of bladder cancers are classified as transitional cell carcinomas (also called urothelial carcinomas), which affect the cells that line the inside of the bladder. In approx­imately 70 percent of transitional cell carcinomas, the cancer is contained within the lining of the bladder.

Since medical appointments are the main time you will interact with your team, being as prepared as possible for these visits is important.

Bladder cancer is most often diag­nosed via a cystoscopy, a minimally invasive procedure in which a narrow tube is inserted into the urethra (the passageway that allows urine to be excreted from the body), enabling the doctor to see the inside of the bladder. This procedure is sometimes combined with a biopsy, where a sample of cells is removed for further testing. There are a wide range of treatments for bladder cancer, including surgery, chemotherapy, transurethral resection (TUR), and immunotherapy (treatment that uses certain parts of the immune system to fight illnesses).

The Importance of Communicating with Your Healthcare Team
As you manage your bladder cancer, it’s important to remember that you are a consumer of healthcare. The best way to make decisions about healthcare is to educate yourself about your diagno­sis and the members of your healthcare team, including nurses, social workers, and patient navigators. Since medical appointments are the main time you will interact with your team, being as prepared as possible for these visits is important. It will help ensure that you understand your diagnosis and treatment, get answers to your questions, and feel more satisfied with your overall care.

While bladder cancer can present many challenges, keep in mind that you do not need to cope with this diagnosis on your own.

Finding Resources
While bladder cancer can present many challenges, keep in mind that you do not need to cope with this diagnosis on your own. Your friends and family are important sources of strength and support. There are also many local and national support services available to assist you.

Financial assistance
There are many organizations that provide help with medical billing, insurance coverage, and reimbursement issues. There is also financial assistance available to help people who cannot afford the cost of their medications. Good places to start your research are the websites of A Helping Hand (cancercare.org/helpinghand.) and the Partnership for Prescription Assistance (pparx.org).

Benefits, entitlements, insurance, and patient rights
Local and county government agencies can give you information on Social Security, state disability, Medicaid, income mainte­nance, the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps).

Get Support
Adjusting to and finding ways to cope with a bladder cancer diagnosis is an important part of healing, along with treatment. There are many organizations, such as CancerCare (cancercare.org.), that provide support services to help people affected by cancer. Individual counseling is available to help you learn ways to cope with the emotions and challenges raised by your diagnosis. Support groups can connect you with others in a safe, supportive environment. Cancer affects the whole person and their loved ones, so it’s important to create a support network as part of managing your care.

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CancerCare offers free face-to-face, telephone, and online support groups led by professional oncology social workers. To learn more, call (800) 813-4673 or visit CancerCare.org.

Reprinted with permission from cancercare.org.

This article was published in Coping® with Cancer magazine, March/April 2017.