2015 National Cancer Survivors Day®
Exclusive Coverage

Coping® magazine is proud to be an ongoing national sponsor of National Cancer Survivors Day® (NCSD). In cooperation with the National Cancer Survivors Day Foundation, Coping is pleased to provide you with exclusive coverage of NCSD 2015.

 

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This 28th annual Celebration of Life was held on Sunday, June 7, in hundreds of communities throughout the world.

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Adopting a New Normal after Cancer

After my doctor told me I had cancer, the rest of the visit was a blur. I was told that I would eventually discover a “new normal,” but this concept was lost on me. I just wanted to have my old normal back.

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Photo by Cancer Type

Tips for Young Adults Navigating the Challenges of Cancer

While cancer disrupts life at any age, for young adults, the disruption often occurs while you are still establishing a sense of personal identity and making crucial de­cisions regarding your education, career, and relationships. Before your diagnosis, you were probably making plans for the future, feeling in control, and exploring your newfound independence. However, the emotional burden of cancer may have left you feeling isolated from your peers, vulnerable, dependent, and uncertain about what comes next.

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Photo by Cancer Type

Get the Facts on Myelofibrosis

Myelofibrosis is a rare bone mar­row cancer in which the marrow is replaced by fibrous (scar) tissue. Myelofibrosis can occur on its own, called primary myelofibrosis, or as a progression of other bone marrow diseases. Myelofibrosis belongs to a group of closely related blood cancers, known as myeloproliferative neoplasms, in which the bone marrow cells that produce the body’s blood cells develop and function abnormally. The result is excessive fibrous tissue formation in the bone marrow, which can lead to severe anemia, weakness, fatigue, and an enlarged spleen and liver.

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A Transformative Moment for Cancer Research
Annual Progress Report from the National Cancer Institute

Although he was writing specifically about financial advice, Franklin’s words could no doubt apply to decades of scientific investment that is opening up numerous, exciting opportunities for progress against cancer. From the rapid emergence of immune-based therapies to the continued advances in cancer genomics that are forever altering how we think about and approach preven­tion, diagnosis, and treatment – this is truly a transformative moment for cancer research.

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Treating Cancer in Older Adults

“I didn’t know older people got cancer.” I hear this frequently from newly diagnosed older adults, who are often surprised to find out that the risk of getting cancer rises dramatically with age. But the fact of the matter is that, thanks to improvements in healthcare, people are living longer, resulting in an increasingly larger population of older Americans and, subsequently, an ever-growing number of older adult cancer survivors.

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Survivor of the Week

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(Photo by Tsar Fedorsky)

Regaining Control

by Barbara Delinsky

Loss of control is a major issue for those with breast cancer. It starts early on, when a problem is first suspected, and suddenly we’re taken over by fear, not to mention mammog­raphy machines, localization needles, hospital release forms, and biopsies. Then a positive diagnosis comes, and we’re really hit for a loop. We’re swamped by new information, con­fused by choices, intimidated by sterile rooms. We worry enough to lose sleep; we’re hurting from surgery, weak from anesthesia, and stressed over family demands; and we are not looking for­ward to the treatment ahead. There’s this big C looming over us, pressing us under its weight, threatening to dominate our daily lives for the next however-long.

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