Prostate Cancer Survivor Stories

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Living with Incontinence after Prostate Surgery

by Rick Redner, MSW, with Brenda Redner, RN

The experience with urinary incontinence begins after a much-anticipated event – the day your catheter is removed. I was delighted to be free from my catheter. For a brief period, it was a happy day.My celebratory mood would last a few brief hours before I experienced an emotional nosedive. I was totally unprepared to deal with my loss of urinary control.

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Jumpers, Minimizers, and Fixers

by Craig T. Pynn

Scattered among the hundreds of thoughtful and caring responses I received to my prostate cancer diagnosis from my family, friends, and colleagues, there were a few reactions that were difficult to handle. After listening to several people attempt to say the right thing while assiduously avoiding the idea of cancer itself, I sorted their deflective responses to my bad news into one of three categories: jumpers, minimizers, and fixers.

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Cancer’s Gift

by Jim Higley

As word of my diagnosis spread through the various circles in my life, I had countless conversations with friends, relatives, and coworkers. These were caring conversations. Reassuring conversations. Conversations focused on this general belief that everything would be OK. It seemed, somehow, that everyone had magical powers with which to see into the future. And what they saw was always good.

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Overcoming the Emotional Challenges of Cancer

by Dawn Speckhart, PhD

Many different emotions arise after someone is diagnosed with cancer. Like most people with cancer, Greg wanted to continue with life as if nothing was wrong. He was willing to complete necessary treatments, but minimized everything. Most people want to play down the impact of their cancer diagnosis so that they don’t worry their family and friends. In truth, this strategy is an attempt to deny that they are worried themselves. What this strategy really does is leave the person with cancer to worry alone.

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Dog Time, Cancer Time

by Dana Jennings

Bijou, like all dogs, runs on primal time. She isn’t constantly barking on her cell and doesn’t stay up late to catch Conan or Letterman. She eats when she’s hungry, drinks when she’s dry, and naps when she’s sleepy. The absolute, very best moment is the one that she’s inhabiting right now. And during and after cancer, I also came to understand that the very best moment is right now.

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Overcoming Cancer with a Full-Court Press

by John Krejci

I don’t like the metaphor of “fighting cancer,” or even the never-ending “War on Cancer.” Less so, empowering cancer by personifying it as “The Beast.” Most people are uncomfortable with these violent, combative modes of dealing with this illness. Let me suggest another metaphor, an alternative to war and violence.

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Moving On with Life after Prostate Cancer

by Gerald Murray

Being diagnosed with prostate cancer after a routine blood test was one of the biggest shocks of my life. At 80 years old, I’ve been retired for 10 years and have been living the good life. Prostate cancer was something I had always heard and read about but never imagined would happen to me.

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Through the Valley

by John Krejci

On my 69th birthday, I was told that my PSA was off the chart, an almost sure sign that I had advanced prostate cancer. Despite the relatively asymptomatic nature of prostate cancer, I was not greatly surprised. However, a definitive diagnosis of advanced, incurable prostate cancer is at best a wakeup call, at worst a life threatening judgment. My life would never be the same again.

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COPING TOGETHER

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