National Cancer Survivors Day

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Personal Relationships

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Cancer and Fertility in Men

by Amanda B. Reed-Maldonado, MD, and James F. Smith, MD, MS

The American Cancer Society estimates that by January 2024 there will be more than 9.3 mil­lion men living with cancer in the United States. One of the most significant side effects fac­ing male cancer survivors is damage to the reproductive system, which may lead to a reduced ability or inability to have children.

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Express Yourself

by Julie Larson, LCSW

A cancer diagnosis can change how you seek support from others. You may look to close friends for lighthearted distraction, or unwavering reassurance, in stressful moments. Supportive family members can be integral in helping you make difficult decisions. And sympathetic colleagues can make profound differ­ences in your transition back to work. However, all too often, relationships become complicated and fraught with hurtful misunderstanding when some­one is diagnosed with cancer.

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Get Help for the Sexual Side Effects of Prostate Cancer Treatment

by Daniela Wittmann, PhD, LMSW

Men diagnosed with prostate cancer often want to know, “How will cancer affect my sex life?” Although beating cancer is certainly the first concern, many men with prostate cancer do factor in sexual side effects as they weigh their prostate cancer treatment options. Sexuality is an important part of everyone’s identity, and the threat of losing it is a worry for many men and their partners. Natu­rally, couples want to learn how they can protect it.

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Making Sure the Kids Are All Right

by Crystal Zelman, LCSW, CCLS, RPT

Children are super resilient. They are amazing beings with their own thoughts, feelings, experi­ences, ways of coping, and support systems. With that said, however, most parents have a strong and instinctive desire to protect their children, espe­cially from hearing the words, “I have cancer.”

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How to be a Friend to Someone with Cancer

by Holly Bertone, CNHP, PMP

“Hi, friend. I wanted to let you know I have some bad news. I have cancer.”
This moment has the potential to change everything, even between the closest of friends, as the lis­tener struggles with what to say or do next. But it shouldn’t.

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In Sickness and in Health

by Susan Hedlund, MSW, LCSW

While a cancer diag­nosis is given to just one person, it can have a ripple effect on everyone who cares about that person. For many cou­ples, the challenges that accompany cancer diagno­sis, treatment, and recovery can be difficult and long lasting. The words “in sick­ness and in health” take on an entirely new meaning when cancer enters the relationship.

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What Do I Tell the Kids?

by Bonnie Indeck, LCSW

If you’re facing the challenge of parenting with cancer, you’re not alone – many cancer survi­vors have children under the age of 18. A cancer diagnosis can be difficult, but talking with your children about it may seem equally challenging or even more difficult.

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Cheers to the Holidays…

by Kaylene Chadwell

For most, the holiday season is a wonderful time of year, filled with cherished traditions and time spent with loved ones. However, when you’re dealing with cancer, the holiday hub­bub of decorating, shopping, cooking, planning, and cleaning can become exhausting and stressful. While there’s no right or wrong way to celebrate, here are some tips to help you have a cheerful, stress-free holiday season.

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