Nutrition

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Take Charge of Your Diet After Cancer

by Linda Goldsmith, MA, RD

Diet and exercise are an integral part of good health, and emerging research suggests that embracing a healthy lifestyle may reduce the risk of cancer recurrence. When it comes to diet, my two favorite words are “variety” and “moderation.”

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What You Need to Know About Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones become less dense and more likely to fracture. It has been called a childhood disease with old age consequences because building healthy bones in youth helps prevent osteoporosis and fractures later in life. However, it is never too late to adopt new habits for healthy bones.

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Building Strong Bones

by Margaret Rosenzweig, PhD, FNP-BC, AOCNP, and Adam Brufsky, MD, PhD

Maintaining bone health is a vital component of wellness. A “thinning” of the bones occurs naturally with age. There are additional factors that can place you at risk for osteoporosis.

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The Importance of Hydration

Dehydration occurs when a person does not take in enough fluid or loses too much fluid. Without enough water, the human body cannot function properly. In particular, people undergoing cancer treatment may be at a higher risk for dehydration due to treatment side effects, such as diarrhea and vomiting. Learning how to stay hydrated, recognizing dehydration, and treating it before it becomes severe are important steps for good health.

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What to Eat During Cancer Treatment

by Holly Clegg

A cancer diagnosis affects every aspect of a person’s life. Much attention is focused on surgery, chemo, and radiotherapy, but a nutritional assessment is equally important. A healthy diet can keep up your strength and immune system, and what you eat may make a difference in how well you handle treatment.

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Make a Commitment to a Healthy Lifestyle

by Wendy Demark-Wahnefried, PhD, RD

A cancer diagnosis can be scary, but it also can serve as a wake-up call that can steer survivors, as well as their family members, toward the road to better health. While earlier reports suggested that large numbers of cancer survivors start to exercise more and eat healthier diets after their diagnosis, more recent studies suggest that these numbers may not be as high as previously thought, or that survivors “fall off the wagon” as time progresses.

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