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Physical Well-being

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RX for a Good Night’s Sleep

by Clare M. Sullivan BSN, MPH, OCN

Having trouble sleeping can be frustrating and isolating. It is also a common problem experi­enced by cancer survivors. If you have difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep more than three times a week, for a month or longer, you may have insomnia. People with cancer are more likely to experience insomnia.

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Breathing Easier When You Have Lung Cancer

Having the best quality of life possible – both during and after treatment – is a goal for most people living with lung cancer. An im­portant component of that is being able to breathe well.

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Tips for Preventing Infection during Chemotherapy

If you are receiving chemotherapy, you may be at risk for getting an infection. This risk is highest when your white blood cell count is at its lowest. Getting an infection can be a life-threatening complication of chemotherapy.

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Are You at Risk for Falls?

by Cassandra Vonnes, MS, ARNP, GNP-BC

It can happen in a blink of an eye – an accident, a misstep, light-­headedness when standing too quickly. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, unintentional falls are the leading cause of injury and death in Americans over the age of 65. Typically, fall risks are highest for the elderly. However, peo­ple with cancer, regardless of age, are also at high risk for falls because of the disease and its complicated treatments.

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Men & Cancer
How Cancer Treatment Affects Your Fertility

by Mary K. Samplaski, MD, and Rebecca Z. Sokol, MD, MPH

When you first hear the words, “You have cancer,” family plan­ning and your future fertility are probably not top of mind. Naturally, you’re likely more focused on things like treatment, survival, and prognosis. However, you may be glad to know that with modern treatment protocols, many cancers have excellent prognoses.

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Quitting Smoking after Cancer

by Suhana de Leon-Sanchez, RN, NP-BC, CTTS, and Jamie Ostroff, PhD

Although most people know that smoking is the most preventable cause of illness in the United States, there is considerably less aware­ness about the risks of continued smoking and the benefits of quitting for those diagnosed with cancer. Many smokers assume that quitting smoking after a cancer diagnosis won’t really make a difference. “Why bother? I already have cancer,” they say. “After all, the damage is done, right?” Wrong.

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Occupational Therapy Helps Cancer Survivors Live Life to Its Fullest

by Brent Braveman, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

According to the American Cancer Society, the number of cancer survivors living in the United States will grow to more than 18 million by 2022. While the good news is that more and more people are surviving cancer, thanks to early detection and treatment advances, many of these survivors will face ongoing challenges due to the harsh toll these life-saving treatments can take on the body.

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What Can Cancer Rehabilitation Do for Me?

by Leslie J. Waltke, PT, DPT

As if hearing the words “you have cancer” isn’t difficult enough, it can be even more distressing to discover that the very treatments used to save your life may cause you pain, fatigue and weak­ness, sapping you of the energy needed to enjoy the very life you are fighting to save. But there is promising news – cancer rehabilitation can help.

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