Physical Well-being

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HELP! My Skin’s Not the Same after Treatment

by Carol R. Drucker, MD

“My skin just hasn’t been the same since chemo­therapy.” I hear this comment frequently from cancer survi­vors, who often follow the statement with a list of the changes they’ve ob­served: drier, more sensitive skin; brittle nails; hair alterations; skin discoloration; and more. Survivor skin can be different from pretreatment skin in many ways. Some skin changes will resolve with time; others may not.

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RX for a Good Night’s Sleep

by Jeanne Erickson, PhD

Imagine waking from a restful night of sleep feeling refreshed, reju- venated, and ready to start the day. If you’ve spent countless restless nights tossing and turning, this may seem like an unattainable luxury. But it doesn’t have to be.

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Fight Fatigue. Feel Better.

by Arash Asher, MD

Fatigue is the most common and often the most distressing side effect of cancer treatment. For some survivors, the issue can persist for months after treatment ends. With cancer-related fatigue the exhaustion you feel seems to be out of proportion to your level of activity. Washing a couple loads of laundry or running a few errands could be all it takes to trigger cancer-related fatigue.

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Coping with Cancer and the Holidays

by Christina Bach, MBE, MSW, LCSW, OSW-C

For many, the holiday season is a joyous time of reconnecting with family and friends, overindulging in seasonal treats, and observing long-standing tra­ditions (or creating new ones). However, along with good tidings and cheer, the holidays also bring steep expectations, obligations, and stress. When cancer is thrown into the mix, the season becomes all the more difficult.

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One Foot in Front of the Other

by Linda T. Gottlieb, MA, CPT, CET

You probably already know that exercise is an important part of staying healthy and can even help prevent disease. But what if you have cancer? What can exercise do for you?

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Cancer-Related Fatigue

by Yesne Alici, MD

Cancer-related fatigue is a distress­ing, persistent, and subjective sense of physical or emotional tiredness that is caused by cancer or its treatment and that interferes with day-to-day functioning. Fatigue is one of the most prevalent and troubling side effects cancer survivors experience both during treatment and after treatment ends. It can significantly diminish a survivor’s quality of life.

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Looking Your Best When You’ve
Lost Your Locks

At an early age, world-renowned celebrity hairstylist David Babaii encountered a deep passion and love for hairdressing. Quickly, his imaginative hair creations gained him worldwide notoriety, allow­ing him the opportunity to work within the world of haute couture with design­ers, fashion magazines, and the world’s top models. A Look Good Feel Better featured beauty expert, David’s passion for hairdressing has also led him to share some of his best advice for women coping with hair loss as a side effect of cancer treatment.

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Commit to Quit

by Danielle Peereboom, MPH, Jody Nicoloso, BA, and Frank Leone, MD, MS

Many smokers who have been diagnosed with cancer continue to smoke, though they may not understand why.. Is this the situation you’re finding yourself in? Have you ever wondered why you don’t have the will­power to just stop already? The answer can be found by examining the addictive effect of nicotine on the brain.

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