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Physical Well-being

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A New Approach to Managing
Cancer-Related Pain

by Tanya J. Uritsky, PharmD

Pain medications have gotten a lot of press over the past couple of years. It seems a new story about the dangers of pain medications is re­ported almost daily – from concerns about misuse, to overdose, to drug-drug interactions and overall safety. In light of recent news coverage, let’s review the basic principles of managing cancer-related pain as we sort through some of the new information that is out there.

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When Sleep Eludes You

by Carol A. Enderlin, PhD, RN, FNGNA, Martha Kuhlmann, DNP, RN, PMHCNS-BC, FNP, APRN, and Ellyn Matthews, PhD, RN, CBSM, FAAN

Sleep is essential for our bodies to restore our energy and re­charge to keep us going. Seldom is sleep more important than when coping with cancer, its treatment, and survivorship. Yet sleep is so connected to how we feel physically and mentally that cancer-related stress can often disturb our sleep quality and patterns. Getting a good night’s sleep may be most elusive when we need it the most.

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Cancer Fatigue:

by Ellen Manzullo, MD, FACP

Fatigue is one of the most com­mon and distressing symptoms experienced by cancer patients and survivors. For some people, fatigue persists even years after completing treat­ment. Cancer-related fatigue is different from the fatigue we all experience in daily living. It is usually more severe, lasts longer, and can have a significant impact on your day-to-day life.

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Cheers to the Holidays…

by Kaylene Chadwell

For most, the holiday season is a wonderful time of year, filled with cherished traditions and time spent with loved ones. However, when you’re dealing with cancer, the holiday hub­bub of decorating, shopping, cooking, planning, and cleaning can become exhausting and stressful. While there’s no right or wrong way to celebrate, here are some tips to help you have a cheerful, stress-free holiday season.

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How to Make Exercise a Part of Your Post-Cancer Life

by Nancy Campbell, MS

It has been six years since the American College of Sports Medicine published their rec­ommendations that all cancer survivors should strive to avoid inactivity. Since then, research has continued to show that rates of cancer recurrence are lower in survivors who are physically active on a regular basis. Not only that, but regular exercise has been shown to help ease many of the side effects of cancer treatment.

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You Can Quit Smoking … for Good

by Vance Rabius, PhD, Diane Beneventi, PhD, and Paul Cinciripini, PhD

“I know I need to quit smoking, but …”
For many smokers, a cancer diagno­sis becomes a catalyst for giving up tobacco. For some, it’s because of pressure from family, friends, or their doctors. However, most people underestimate how difficult it is to quit and falsely attribute their failure to do so to a personal weakness. Hence the “but” in the statement above.

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Exercise and Cancer

by Claudio Battaglini, PhD, FACSM, and Erik Hanson, PhD, CSCS

Since the first studies examining the effects of exercise in cancer survivors began to be published in the mid-80s, the interest in this in­triguing area of research has grown exponentially. Because exercise is non-invasive, effective, and can be done by cancer survivors in the comfort and convenience of their own homes, the medical community has started to give more attention to the use of exercise as a complementary intervention in cancer rehabilitation.

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For Women with Gynecologic Cancer

by Stephanie V. Blank, MD, FACOG

A cancer diagnosis is naturally unsettling, evoking a wide range of emotions. Because talking about gynecologic organs is still practically taboo for so many women, a below-the-belt cancer diag­nosis can be even more distressing. Studies consistently demonstrate that many women are reluctant to even ask their doctor questions about gyneco­logic cancer testing, risk factors, and genetic predisposition, much less dis­cuss potential symptoms.

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