Caregiving

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Caring for a Loved One with Cancer

Many cancer patients today receive part of their care at home. People with cancer are living longer, and many patients want to be cared for at home as much as possible. This support is often given by family caregivers. Today, family caregivers do many things that used to be done in the hospital or a doctor's office. In fact, they play a large role in the health care system in the United States.

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Coming Full Circle as a Caregiver

by Susan Beausang

I never stop learning from my mother. Through Mom, I am learning what it is like to make your way through cancer treatment at the age of 89. It is nothing like the mom I witnessed facing and beating cancer over 30 years ago. The medical system, cancer treatment, and most importantly, Mom have changed. This experience guiding, caring, and advocating for Mom has me more convinced than ever of the importance of patient advocates and personal caregivers.

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A Fight for Love

by Stacie Rutar

I signed up for karate classes at a local dojo in December 2004 to learn self-defense and to get in shape. Although I had expected to learn how to fight, I had no idea that only three years later I would end up fighting for the love of my life in that very same dojo.

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Living with the Giant

by Cynthia Siegfried

Living with cancer is like living with an unwelcome, uninvited giant in your home. After you recover from the initial shock of his arrival and realize he has decided to stay a while, you must decide how you will adjust to his presence. Do you get to know him better so that you are prepared for his next attack? Or do you ignore him and hope he will disappear? Do you make a strategic battle plan?

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November is National Family Caregivers Month

Every day, family members, friends, neighbors, and concerned individuals across America provide essential attention and assistance to their loved ones. Many individuals in need of care – including children, elders, and persons with disabilities – would have difficulty remaining safely in their homes and community without the support of their relatives and caregivers.

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Finding Balance as a Cancer Caregiver

by Steve Keir, DrHP, MPH

We can only estimate the number of familial cancer caregivers in the United States, as there is no formal system designed to capture this data. However, we do know the number of people living with a history of cancer. If each person living with cancer had just one caregiver, a conservative estimate would approximate that there are at least 10.5 million people who have either provided care or continue to provide care for a loved one with cancer.

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Taking Care of You

by Joanne Corbo Cruz, MSW, LMSW, ACT

When my mom was diagnosed with Stage IV breast cancer in 1999, my life and my family’s lives changed. Each day after that was different, not taken for granted and very precious. It truly brought my family closer. But with all the focus on taking care of my mom and the rest of my family, it was easy for me to forget about myself and my needs.

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Meeting the Challenges of Long-Distance Caregiving

by Lazelle E. Benefield, PhD, RN, FAAN

“My mother lives 400 miles away, and I miss opportunities to visit with her. This means I also miss opportunities to accompany her to doctors’ visits and be with her as she receives chemotherapy treatment.”

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