Medical Side Effects Information

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Coping with the Cognitive Side Effects
of Cancer

by Jeffrey S. Wefel, PhD, ABPP, and Mariana E. Bradshaw, PhD, ABPP

Among the possible side effects of cancer, many survivors report changes in their thinking skills during and after treatment. The severity of these changes varies by person and can include memory problems; difficulty with concentrating, multitasking, and word finding; and slowed thinking. This cancer-related cognitive impairment is often referred to as chemo brain.

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HELP! My Skin’s Not the Same after Treatment

by Carol R. Drucker, MD

“My skin just hasn’t been the same since chemo­therapy.” I hear this comment frequently from cancer survi­vors, who often follow the statement with a list of the changes they’ve ob­served: drier, more sensitive skin; brittle nails; hair alterations; skin discoloration; and more. Survivor skin can be different from pretreatment skin in many ways. Some skin changes will resolve with time; others may not.

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Questions and Answers about Lymphedema

by Stanley G. Rockson, MD, FACP, FACC

Lymphedema is the accumulation of a protein-rich body fluid called lymph, typically in one part of the body, when the lymphatic system for fluid transport is damaged. For example, if lymph nodes are removed from the armpit region during breast cancer treatment, lymphedema can occur in that arm.

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Chemo Brain

by Fremonta Meyer, MD

Over the past several years, the medical community has become increasingly aware of a phenom­enon that cancer survivors have long experienced – chemo brain. Yes, recent research shows that cancer-related “brain fog” is real, and it can have a significant impact on quality of life.

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Protect Yourself from Infection

by Kimberly Hinckley, RN, BSN, CIC, and Brahm H. Segal, MD

Infections are illnesses caused by microorganisms (germs) such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi. People with cancer may be at increased risk for infections for a number of reasons.

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How Cancer Affects Your Skin

by Mario E. Lacouture, MD

Dr. Mario Lacouture answers questions on treatment-related skin complications.

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Looking Your Best When You’ve
Lost Your Locks

At an early age, world-renowned celebrity hairstylist David Babaii encountered a deep passion and love for hairdressing. Quickly, his imaginative hair creations gained him worldwide notoriety, allow­ing him the opportunity to work within the world of haute couture with design­ers, fashion magazines, and the world’s top models. A Look Good Feel Better featured beauty expert, David’s passion for hairdressing has also led him to share some of his best advice for women coping with hair loss as a side effect of cancer treatment.

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Living with Diabetes and Cancer

by by Sonali N. Thosani, MD, and Victor R. Lavis, MD

Nearly 26 million people in the United States are living with diabetes. Of those 26 million people, 7 million don’t know they have it. An even greater number, 79 million people have a condition called pre-diabetes, which means they are at a very high risk of developing diabetes.

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