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Managing Incontinence for Men with Cancer

A lot of men have incontinence after treatment for prostate cancer, but it can happen after being treated for other cancers too. If you have this problem, you are not alone. Be sure to talk to your doctor if you are having trouble controlling your urine. There are ways to help.

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Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer Shows a Decrease in Overall Cancer Deaths

The Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer has shown that death rates for lung cancer, which accounts for more than one in four cancer deaths, are dropping at a faster pace than in previous years. The report was coauthored by researchers from the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries.

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Know Your Options for Starting a Family after Cancer

by Sarah C. Hessler, MD, and Aimee Seungdamrong, MD

The ability to start a family is now a possibility for increasing numbers of women and men after cancer treatment. If you’ve been wondering whether you’ll be able to have children after chemotherapy or radiation, you’ll be pleased to know that, thanks to advances in the field of reproductive assistance and fertility preservation, you do have several options to consider.

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New ASCO Choosing Wisely® List Details Five Cancer Tests and Treatments Routinely Performed Despite Lack of Evidence

The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has announced its second “Top Five” list of opportunities to improve the quality and value of cancer care. Published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology (JCO), ASCO’s second Top Five list was released as part of the Choosing Wisely® campaign, sponsored by the ABIM Foundation, to encourage conversations between physicians and patients aimed at curbing the use of certain tests and procedures that are not supported by clinical research.

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Control Your Cancer Pain

by Dhanalakshmi Koyyalagunta, MD

Pain is a distressing but common side effect of cancer and its treatment. In fact, many of the estimated 14 million cancer survivors in the United States will experience cancer pain at some point. For some, the cancer itself is the cause of the pain. For others, cancer treatments can lead to painful chemotherapy-induced periph­eral neuropathy, radiation-induced tissue damage, and post-surgical pain.

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Cancer, the Flu, and You

If you have cancer now or have had cancer in the past, you are at higher risk for complications from the flu. To help prepare you for the flu this season, here are answers to some of your most important flu-related questions.

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Cancer Survivors Have More Frequent and Severe Menopausal Hot Flashes

Women who survive cancer have more frequent, severe, and troubling hot flashes than other women with menopausal symptoms, according to a study published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). But surprisingly, the cancer survivors fare better psychologically and report a better quality of life than the women without cancer and have about the same levels of sexual activity and function.

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What’s New in Cancer Research?

Highlights of the 49th annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology

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