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Surfing the Web for Cancer Information

by Janet Teixeira, LCSW

The Internet can be a tremendous source of informa­tion for people with cancer, but it can also instill fear and pessimism that can have a negative effect on a person’s ability to cope with and beat this disease.

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Obtaining Your Medical Records

It is a good idea to have a copy of your medical records. For example, medical records are generally requested for a second opinion. However, the laws for obtaining records vary by state. Many states allow medical records to be released directly to the patient. Other states require that medical records be sent directly to the consulting physician.

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Advancements in Fertility Preservation Provide New Options for People with Cancer

Many young people who’ve just learned that they have cancer also are told that the therapies that may save their lives could rob them of their ability ever to have children. Infertility caused by chemotherapy and radiation affects a sizable population: Of the 1.5 million people diagnosed with cancer in 2009, nearly 10 percent were still in their reproductive years.

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Genetic Testing

by Angela R. Bradbury, MD, Colleen Burke Sands, MPH,
and Linda Patrick-Miller, PhD

Thousands of women have had BRCA testing to evaluate their risk for breast and ovarian cancer. After testing, many people and their doctors are able to make decisions about their healthcare. But another decision – if and when parents should tell their children – is less clear.

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ASCO Releases Sixth Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer

The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has released Clinical Cancer Advances 2010: ASCO’s Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer, a critical review of the year’s most important clinical cancer research.

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Physical Symptoms Prevalent No Matter What Stage of Cancer

Twenty-two physical symptoms associated with cancer – symptoms often unrecognized and undertreated – are prevalent in all types of cancers, regardless of whether the person is newly diagnosed, undergoing treatment, or is a cancer survivor, according to a study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Cancer Care Comes of Age

by Deborah Boyle, RN, MSN, FAAN

Older people with cancer often have a different set of concerns than other adults with cancer. Cancer care needs to be specifically tailored to this ever-growing population.

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Managing Cancer-Related Anemia

by Lori Smith, MSN, CRNP

Anemia is a common symptom experienced by people who are receiving chemotherapy or radiation treatment for cancer. It is a condition in which the blood is deficient in red blood cells, in hemoglobin, or in total volume. There are a multitude of causes for anemia, including pre-existing or current conditions, hereditary conditions, renal insufficiency, nutritional deficits, chronic anemia, hemolysis, and malignancy.

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