Breast Cancer Survivor Stories

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Whatever the Emotion, It’s Okay

by Nancy Rea

What is it about women that makes us believe, not just presume but truly believe, that we have to be strong? Why must we be everything to everyone, even to the detriment of our own selves?

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My Cancer Journey

by Linda Townsend

May 2005 was when I first heard those life-changing words, “You have cancer.” I felt as if I was receiving a death sentence. My mother had been diagnosed with cancer at age 54 and was given a 90 percent chance of recovery. But she lost her battle just three years later.

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From O. R. to P. R.
How Cancer Taught Me to Pursue My Dreams

by Fran Di Giacomo

I needed to write a book, and I had every opportunity an author would need to fail. As a professional artist and career cancer patient I’d been on chemotherapy for five years. I didn’t have a computer, fax machine, cell phone, or college degree. I just knew how to juggle multiple tumors, surgeries, chemotherapy sessions, art galleries, portrait commissions, and armies of medical staff, and how to enjoy life.

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I Once Spent Time on the Mountaintop

by Harriet Cox

When I was first diagnosed with breast cancer, I felt a mental numbness. Because I didn’t hurt, it was hard to believe that I had a life-threatening disease. As time wore on and treatment was scheduled, I began to believe it, and the numbness was replaced with a fear and despondency so strong that I struggled through each day.

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The Transformative Power of Cancer

by Meme Hieneman, PhD

My friends and family say I have changed since I was diagnosed with cancer, that now I am often unpredictable. And they are right. Cancer has caused me to question all that I thought I believed and wanted. My moods vary from peaceful to irritable, ecstatic to depressed. I am mediating an ongoing conflict between who I was before, who I am now, and who I ultimately hope to be.

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Reclaiming My Life after Metastatic Breast Cancer

by Jean Rymon

The first thing my oncologist stressed to me after I was diagnosed with breast cancer was the importance of my attitude and support network. To this day, I continue to live by that advice.

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I Had Cancer on My Wedding Day

by Crystal Brown-Tatum

As I flip through my wedding album, all of the details are a blur. I don’t notice the flowers or the detailed cake. What I cherish is the genuine smile on my face that reflects the love in my heart for so many things. Dazzling in my strapless wedding gown, little did I know I had breast cancer. Ironic isn’t it? I look so happy while cancer was dwelling inside me.

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When Chemo Brain Follows You Home

by Beth Leibson

We sat on comfy sofas talking about fainting. Passing out was frightening, embarrassing, and seemingly inevitable. Someone was listing the various places we, as a cancer support group, had lost consciousness: the workplace, the schoolyard, on the way home from chemotherapy.

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