Breast Cancer Survivor Stories

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House Resolution 787 – Metastatic Breast Cancer Awareness Day October 13

by Kathy Coursey-Boes

On July 19, 2009, at 6am, I drove with my 12 year old daughter Addie from Oxford, Georgia to Washington, DC, to join our group of breast cancer patients and family members. The Metastatic Breast Cancer Network would train us in the legislative and advocacy process. The drive was long and the day was hot, but it was important for me to be in Washington and have my voice heard. It was important for Addie to see me fighting on behalf of my beliefs and the needs of others. I was part of the group representing all of us with stage IV breast cancer and the issues that are unique to us.

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A Few Minutes with Namrata

by Laura Shipp

Because of her family’s history of breast cancer, Namrata Singh Gujral had her first mammogram at age 25. For the next seven years, those regular mammograms came back clean every time. After all, she was young – too young to get breast cancer, she thought – and healthy. But the actress who is known for her titular role in Americanizing Shelley says an inner voice prompted her to be vigilant anyway. It’s a good thing she listened.

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Sisters on the Journey

by Karen Sudduth

As my friend and I sat in that bistro, we shared more than French pastries. We acknowledged our vulnerability, and we shared hope. We were two sisters on the journey, nourishing our bodies and spirits with encouragement.

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Bald Chicks Rule

by Mary Beth Hall

My new counseling job at the high school started in late July, just a few months after my breast cancer diagnosis. I could hardly keep my head up because of the radiation treatments, and I hadn’t even started working yet. I didn’t know how I was going to start a new job in this shape.

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Men Don’t Have Breasts!

by Eric Dunlap

A year before my cancer diagnosis, after working in the yard, I noticed a spot of blood on my shirt. Thinking that I had scratched myself, I dismissed the occurrence. Later that day, another spot appeared. After looking at my chest, I determined that the blood came from the nipple, so I scheduled a doctor’s appointment.

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A New Perspective

by Florence Ferreira

Three years ago, a doctor told me that I had three to six months to live. My breast cancer had spread extensively to my bones, my lungs, and my liver. Today, I am in stable condition. I was very upset at this doctor’s insensitivity for a while. How dare anyone tell me when I’m going to die? But looking back, his gloomy prognosis paradoxically gave me a new life-giving perspective.

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Accept and Fight

by Anne Beckman

For six and a half years, a monster named cancer has been chewing on my body. It began with breast cancer. After a year’s treatment, the beast went into remission. Three years later, pre-cancerous cells demanded a hysterectomy. Two years later, cancer reappeared on my skull and spine.

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Whatever the Emotion, It’s Okay

by Nancy Rea

What is it about women that makes us believe, not just presume but truly believe, that we have to be strong? Why must we be everything to everyone, even to the detriment of our own selves?

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