Breast Cancer Survivor Stories

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Redefining ‘Survivor’

by Nicole Malato

There are different definitions of “survivor.” Until recently, I had always thought it was someone who “beat cancer” and went on to remission for many years. Now I am learning that using that definition minimizes the experiences of other survivors and prevents those who have earned the title from rightfully using it. I am embracing the fact that I am indeed a survivor already. I have overcome the many obstacles to earn this honorable distinction.

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Fighting for Two

by Roxanne Martinez

Imagine learning you are pregnant, then being diagnosed with an aggressive breast cancer days later. That was the predicament I found myself in last November. Days after receiving the devastating diagnosis and with a whirlwind of emotions, I scheduled my first obstetrician appointment and my initial meetings with my surgeon and oncologist – all on the same day.

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The Bet

by Jana Johnston Moritzkat

Amy agonized over losing her blonde cotton candy hair to the shower drain. Her poker straight locks were baby fine, and when she teased and coated them with hairspray they puffed up and swirled like spun sugar. The chemotherapy nurse had said her hair would begin falling out two weeks after her first treatment. That was three days ago.

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On Surviving Breast Cancer – A Nurse’s Perspective

by Kathyrn T. Negri, RN

Some years ago while working on the medical unit, I overheard a doctor tell a woman she had breast cancer. The woman was in disbelief. She let out an agonizing cry and started shaking uncontrollably. My heart ached for her. I couldn’t help but wonder how I would react to such news. It wasn’t until years later that I found myself in the same predicament.

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What I Learned the First Five Years

by Vivian Roe

On March 3, 2011, I hit a milestone that not long ago I never expected I would reach: Cancer Survivor – 5 years. Still, I can’t say that I feel like I’m out of the woods quite yet, and the physical scars from treatment remind me of that fact.

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Remember To Rotate & Balance

by Fran Di Giacomo

Each individual must figure out the best way to apply the lessons in life, but I want to remind you about B-A-L-A-N-C-E. Some people pay more attention to the maintenance on their car than maintaining their life. So take a tip from your owner’s manual – just as you rotate and balance your tires to keep them running smoothly, check for rotation and balance in your life.

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My Doctor Fired Me!

by Michele Forsten

“You’re no longer my patient,” Dr. L, my trusted gynecologist of 15 years, told me. “Where do you want me to have your records sent?” What had I done to deserve this? Argue relentlessly about a bill? Get caught stealing K-Y jelly? None of the above. What I did was try to take care of myself the best way I knew how.

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Fuzzy Brain

by Deborah J. Jesseman

It has been nine months since my breast cancer diagno­sis. My doctors have been wonderful and professional. I have received information, known my choices, made decisions, and been aware of the consequences. But one thing I was not prepared for was chemo brain, or as we call it at our house, “fuzzy brain.”

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