Breast Cancer Survivor Stories

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Face to Face with Fatigue

by Marilyn R. Grainger, RN

As an oncology nurse, in 1995, I participated in the Oncology Nursing Society’s patient education program Fatigue Initiative Research and Educa­tion (FIRE). The goal of FIRE was to teach oncology nurses about the reality of cancer-related fatigue, along with proven interventions to lessen this com­mon cancer- and treatment-related side effect. I never imag­ined that one day I would be diagnosed with breast cancer and would need to apply what I had learned at that conference to my own recovery.

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After

by Gail Presnell-Jones

Today is the day I’ve decided
That I will not die.
Or at the very least,
I’ve decided that I’ll try

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Cancer: Only a Part of Who I Am

by Denise Cooper

I am 53 years old, and I have stage IV breast cancer. Do I let this fact define me as a person? Should I? Absolutely not! I have a choice to make each day. Do I wake up with a negative, feel-sorry-for-myself attitude? Or do I face the day with an uplifting outlook so that I can be an inspiration to someone else and turn this negative diagnosis into something positive? I al­ways try to go with the second option.

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Pink

by Vallory Jones

Pink is not cotton candy at the circus.
It is not nail polish on my toes.
Or bubblegum.
It is my destiny.
My future.
My journey.

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How I Rebooted My Life after Cancer

by Francine Brokaw

When I was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 38, it was a complete shock. I was the first woman in my family to have breast cancer. I was a writer and had been a tennis instructor years before, and I still enjoyed playing whenever I could. But what I did for a living didn’t matter at that moment; all I wanted to do was get the cancer out of my body and get on with my life.

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You Have the Power!

by Regina E. Savage

Today is a present, truly a gift. Just think, we have been given a second chance – a chance to change things for the better, to make our lives what we want them to be. There is so much good that can come from cancer. I know that might sound unbelievable, but it’s true.

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Cancer Survivors Can …

by Nicole Malato

When I was diagnosed with cancer, I remember thinking that my life was irrevocably changed. I was right. But not in ways I would have expected. At first, my future felt limited. In time, I understood that it wasn’t. I thought that being a cancer survivor was something to be afraid of or sad about. Then I realized it was something to be proud of. I learned early on in my survivorship that there is indeed hope in cancer: hope for a cure, and hope for making the world a better place.

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My Cancer Resume

by Nancy Stordahl

Sometimes it feels like my job, or at least my part-time job, is cancer. It also feels like I am constantly making additions to my can­cer resume. Generally, on a resume, experience is a good thing – the more of it you have, the better. On a cancer resume … not so much.

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