Prostate Cancer Information

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Updated Tool Now Available to Predict Prostate Cancer Spread

Prostate cancer experts at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, MD, have developed an updated version of the Partin Tables, a tool to help men diagnosed with prostate cancer and their doctors to better assess their chance of a surgical cure. The updated tool is published in the British Journal of Urology International. This represents the third update of the data.

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What You Need to Know about Urinary Incontinence after Prostate Cancer Treatment

by Jeffrey Albaugh, PhD, APM, CUCNS

Men treated for prostate cancer know that when the catheter comes out, the leakage may begin. For many men, this leakage may resolve over the next year, but for some men, the issue may last longer. Research reveals approximately 15 percent of men are incontinent up to one year following either radical prostatectomy or laparoscopic prostatectomy. It can take as long as two years for men to regain urinary continence.

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Exploring Your Treatment Options for Prostate Cancer

Men with prostate cancer have many treatment options. These options include active surveillance, surgery, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy. You may receive more than one type of treatment.

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Above-the-Belt Relationship Changes That Can Come with Prostate Cancer

by Arnold Melman, MD, and Rosemary E. Newnham

Although many men see their temporary or permanent loss of erectile function as the chief change that affects their relationships post-treatment, most researchers would argue that the bigger changes happen – and need to happen – above the belt buckle: in the brain and in the heart.

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FDA Expands Zytiga’s Use for Late-stage Prostate Cancer

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has expanded the approved use of Zytiga® (abiraterone acetate) to treat men with late-stage (metastatic) castration-resistant prostate cancer prior to receiving chemotherapy.

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Prostate Cancer Affects Women, Too

by Cindie Hubiak

Our society considers prostate cancer solely a man’s disease. It’s not. Prostate cancer can affect women physically, emotionally, and spiritually. To complicate matters further, many men don’t want anyone to know about their diagnosis and treatment. This vow of silence reduces potential resources for women, pushing the topic under a rug, causing many of us to feel suffocated and isolated.

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Navigating the Road to Recovery

Recovery from prostate cancer treatment is different for everyone. Once you have selected your treatment option, talk with other prostate cancer survivors who can help you understand what you can expect during your recovery process. Remember to include physician specialists, supportive family members, and friends who can provide various levels of support during your treatment and recovery.

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Man, Cancer, Sex

by Anne Katz, RN, PhD

One of the greatest myths in society suggests that all men are sexual machines. The expectation is that men can have sex on demand, at any time, in any place, no matter what his feelings or emotions are. Here’s another myth: Men don’t talk about their feelings and certainly don’t want to talk about sex. Well, the last part may be partially true. It’s not always easy to talk in a meaningful way about sex.

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