Breast Cancer Information

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New Treatment for Late-stage Breast Cancer

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Kadcyla (ado-trastuzumab emtansine), a new therapy for patients with HER2-positive, late-stage (metastatic) breast cancer. Kadcyla is intended for patients who were previously treated with trastuzumab, another anti-HER2 therapy, and taxanes, a class of chemotherapy drugs commonly used for the treatment of breast cancer.

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If Breast Cancer Comes Back

If breast cancer comes back, it may return in the same place. This is called a recurrence, because it is not a new cancer. But a recurrence can also appear in a place not directly related to the first breast cancer. This is called a metastasis, and if cancer is detected in several areas, these are called metastases.

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Highlights of the 2012 Breast Cancer Symposium

New studies on breast cancer screening, treatment, and survival were presented at the 2012 Breast Cancer Symposium held September 13-15, 2012, in San Francisco, California.

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High-quality Personal Relationships Improve Survival in Women with Breast Cancer

The quality of a woman’s social networks — the personal relationships that surround an individual — appears to be just as important as the size of her networks in predicting breast cancer survival, Kaiser Permanente scientists report in the current issue of Breast Cancer Research and Treatment.

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The Emotional Impact of Advanced Breast Cancer

When you find out you have advanced breast cancer, it is normal to feel shocked or alone, or to feel a sense of despair. Sometimes crying and expressing your sadness is enough to get you through the tough emotions that can come with a diagnosis of advanced breast cancer. But sometimes you may feel so bad that you lose interest in the things that used to make you happy. You may feel like staying in bed all day and stop reaching out to friends and family.

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A Couple’s Guide to Facing Breast Cancer Together

by Susan Hedlund, MSW, LCSW, OSW-C

The diagnosis of cancer is a life crisis for anyone who hears those words: “you’ve got cancer.” The impact, however, extends beyond the person receiving the news. Cancer affects the whole family. For couples, there is a profound impact. The challenges that come with a cancer diagnosis, treatment, and recovery can be difficult and long lasting. The words “in sickness and in health” take on an entirely new meaning when cancer enters the picture. Still, most couples can and do get through the experience, and some report a renewed sense of closeness afterward.

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Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Update

by Lisa A. Carey, MD

Breast cancer is not one disease; it is a family of diseases that differ from one another in biology and in their behavior. While scientists have an increasing array of tools to identify subtypes of breast cancer at the molecular level, doctors rely on three tools to help make treatment decisions: 1) measurement of the estrogen receptor (ER), 2) the related protein progesterone receptor (PR), and 3) a separate protein, HER2.

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What You Need to Know if You Choose Breast Reconstruction

by Karen M. Horton, MD, MSC, FACS, FRCSD

A woman’s feelings about her breasts can influence her self-image and femininity. Breast reconstruction helps to restore a woman’s body image after facing cancer treatment. The goal of breast reconstruction is to help women feel better about themselves and to provide a beautiful, natural, long-lasting breast reconstruction.

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