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Advancements in Fertility Preservation Provide New Options for People with Cancer


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Many young people who’ve just learned that they have cancer also are told that the therapies that may save their lives could rob them of their ability ever to have children. Infertility caused by chemotherapy and radiation affects a sizable population: Of the 1.5 million people diagnosed with cancer in 2009, nearly 10 percent were still in their reproductive years.

The good news, according to an article in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, is that techniques to harvest and store reproductive cells have vastly improved in the last several years. “Fertility preservation is still an emerging discipline,” says Mayo Clinic reproductive endocrinologist Jani Jensen, MD, lead author of the paper, “but rapid advances in technology in the last several years are now providing new options for patients.”

In the review, researchers looked at both long-standing and emerging fertility preservation technologies. Freezing sperm remains a stable and reliable technique, but one approach that has had considerable success in the last five years involves freezing eggs harvested from women. Oocytes are particularly fragile cells that rupture easily, and even though research to preserve them dates back to the 1970s, the first successful birth from a stored egg didn’t occur until the mid-1980s. “But in the last five years,” Dr. Jensen says, “there have been considerable improvements in freezing technology. Since 2004, there have been thousands of babies born worldwide from frozen eggs.”

“Fertility preservation is still an emerging discipline, but rapid advances in technology in the last several years are now providing new options for patients.”

One long-standing and familiar approach available to people with cancer remains the freezing of embryos. “Embryos are hardy and can survive the freezing and thawing process better than individual eggs, so they actually have a better chance of creating a successful pregnancy,” Dr. Jensen explains. The approach may be a good fit for people who are married or have a long-term partner, she adds, but it’s not necessarily an answer for the youngest survivors.

One scientific challenge that research is now addressing is cultivating and storing sperm and egg tissue from prepubescent cancer patients. “There’s promising work emerging that’s striving to prompt the maturation of this tissue in the laboratory,” she says. “The hope is that the tissue could be used later in patients’ lives to create pregnancies. To date, there haven’t been pregnancies that have resulted from this approach, but the work is under way.”

Despite recent advances, a hurdle that remains is informing people about the options that are available just as they are learning about the cancer treatment that lies ahead of them. Timing is of the essence, notes Dr. Jensen. “Fertility preservation treatments can take two to three weeks, and it’s better to take the steps [to harvest and freeze cells] before cancer care begins,” she says.

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This article was published in Coping® with Cancer magazine, January/February 2011.