In This eUpdate:
Cancer - 25 Years Later
Maximizing Cancer Pain Management
Changing Your Stars
Living with Diabetes and Cancer
 
Neil Fiore

Cancer – 25 Years Later
by Neil Fiore, PhD, 30-year survivor of a
"terminal" cancer diagnosis

When the first edition of my book Coping with the Emotional Impact of Cancer: Become an Active Patient and Take Charge of Your Treatment was published in1984, the stigma associated with the word cancer was so strong that I had to fight to get the word cancer included in the title. Twenty-five years ago, it was considered controversial for patients to actively participate in their medical treatment.
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Maximizing Cancer Pain Management
by Betty Ferrell, RN, PhD, MA, FAAN, FPCN, and
Tami Borneman, RN, MSN, CNS, FPCN

The first step toward pain relief is assessing your pain and communicating it to others. You can rate your pain on a scale of 0 (no pain) to 10 (severe pain). Providing a rating of your pain will help healthcare professionals understand your pain and monitor progress in treating it. Describing the effectiveness of your pain management plan is also vital.
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Survivor Photo

Changing Your Stars
by Michelle Whitlock, Survivor of the Week

Star light, star bright, cancer came into my life one night. Initially, it turned my universe upside down. Cancer shook the ground beneath my feet and blinded my sight.

“Why me?” I was young, just 26, and felt healthy. This couldn’t be happening. I was too busy for cancer. I was focused on my career and climbing the corporate ladder. I had a plan, and cancer wasn’t part of it.
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Living with Diabetes and Cancer
by Anne Beckman, Survivor of the Week

Glucometer, check. Test strips, check. Lancets, check. Snack, check. Bottled water, check. Diabetes medications, check. Cell phone, check. These items are part of the daily checklist of every person with diabetes leaving home for any length of time. Now imagine this same individual going to a cancer treatment center for a full day of testing, chemotherapy, office visits, etc. Sound familiar?
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