In This eUpdate:
Desperate Housewives’ Kathryn Joosten
Surviving the Storm
Lessons Learned
Five Simple Rules for Talking About Cancer
 

Kathryn JoostenA CONVERSATION WITH
 
Desperate Housewives’ Kathryn Joosten Opens Up About Her Latest Encounter with Lung Cancer

Eight years ago, Kathryn Joosten, who plays spirited neighbor Mrs. McCluskey on ABC’s Desperate Housewives, went head to head with lung cancer. A smoker at the time (she has since quit), Kathryn knew well the dangers of her nicotine habit, so she committed herself to twice-yearly chest X-rays – a well-advised precaution, which ultimately led to early detection of her disease. After surgery to remove her upper right lobe, Kathryn was in the clear. She was cancer-free. But in September of this year, Kathryn received the news that every survivor fears – recurrence. A fate she once hoped she had outmaneuvered by passing the five-year mark.
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Surviving the Storm
How to Attain Emotional Healing in Turbulent Times

by Gregory W. Lester, PhD

A cancer diagnosis is a transformational event, in other words, an event that changes everything. It changes how we feel, how we think, and how we see ourselves, others, and even life itself. But a cancer diagnosis isn’t just a transformational event, it’s an unpleasant transformational event – one that you didn’t expect, you don’t like, and that produces changes you wish hadn’t happened.
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Survivor photo Lessons Learned
by Jane Jayroe, Survivor of the Week

The sound of my doctor’s voice on the telephone put life on pause. I didn’t want to hear another word. With my eyes closed, I received the message that transported me into the world of cancer. I cowered in fear and begged God, “Not me!”
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Five Simple Rules for Talking About Cancer
by Mary Beth Hall

After experiencing many times when telling someone about my breast cancer diagnosis and the person immediately telling me all of their problems in great detail, turning me into the counselor again and again, I wondered what was happening. A counselor doesn’t just listen. A counselor actively listens. This is a verb. It means staying involved, maintaining eye contact, responding, and “being there.” Why were people putting me in this position when I was already tired from the cancer and the shock? It was completely wearing me out.
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