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Talking with Your Doctor about Allergic Asthma

Asthma image

If you’re living with allergic asthma, you know what a physical and emotional rollercoaster ride it can feel like. The best way to smooth out the ups and downs is by working with your healthcare professional to identify the precise triggers of your asthma symp­toms. Once these are identified, you can take the appropriate steps toward effective treatment.

To identify your asthma triggers, your doctor will most likely collect your medical history, perform a physi­cal exam, and perform an allergy skin test that will help determine how sen­sitive you are to a specific allergen. If you’re like the majority of people with asthma, your symptoms are triggered by an allergic component that may re­quire special attention. Talking with your doctor about treatments specifi­cally for allergic asthma can offer the opportunity to develop a personalized treatment plan or to fine-tune one that already exists.

If you’re like the majority of people with asthma, your symptoms are triggered by an allergic component that may re­quire special attention.

A good place to start the conversation is by describing your asthma symptoms. Choose your words carefully, however. They can greatly affect your doctor’s assessment of your health and the sub­sequent course of treatment he or she recommends. Blood tests, skin tests, and readings from a peak flow meter all provide valuable information, but it’s your symptoms that point your doc­tor in the right direction.

In fact, you should review your symp­toms before you even enter the waiting room. Make sure you know how you would answer the following questions:

  • What exactly are my symptoms? Have they changed recently?
  • When do I find myself having them? How long do they last?
  • Do they prevent me from doing normal activities like sleeping, house­work, yard work, or going to work or school?

In addition to answering questions about your asthma symptoms, you’ll most likely be asked to describe your living conditions. For example, your doctor may want to know about your home’s location, any surrounding plant life, the type of heating system you have, the type of pillow you use, the type of fabric on your furniture, and so on. De­tails like these provide valuable clues into the cause of your symptoms and suggest possible ways to reduce your exposure to an offending allergen.

The accuracy of the information you provide is essential to finding the right treatment to target the inflamma­tion involved in allergic reactions.

Remember, you are the most impor­tant part of your treatment plan.

 

Source: Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, www.aafa.org

This article was originally published in Coping® with Allergies & Asthma magazine, Winter 2011-2012.