Return to Previous Page

Allergy Triggers Articles

 

House Dust

House dust is a mixture of many substances. Its content may vary from home to home, but the most common allergy triggers contained in house dust are dust mites, cockroaches, fungi (mold), and animal dander. Exposure to even small amounts of the offending allergen can cause allergy or asthma symptoms.

Read More

 

Out with the Mold

Many types of molds (microscopic fungi) live in our environment. Mold grows in indoor and outdoor areas that are warm, dark, and moist. Molds reproduce and grow by sending tiny spores into the air. Inhaled spores cause allergy and asthma symptoms. Examples of allergy symptoms include itchy eyes, runny nose, and rash.

Read More

 

What Allergy & Asthma Fighters Need to Know Before Building or Remodeling a Home

Are you thinking about remodeling your home, or building a new one? If so, there are several things you need to know about the impact this may have on your allergies. The dust, debris, and fumes from remodeling or construction can wreak havoc on your eyes, nose, and skin. Knowing about some specific hazards, however, can help you minimize the impact on your allergies.

Read More

 

Easing the Itch of the Great Outdoors

Many native and exotic plants are poisonous to humans when ingested or if there is skin contact with plant chemicals. However, the most common problems with poisonous plants arise from contact with the sap oil of several ever-present native plants that can cause an allergic skin reaction – poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac.

Read More

 

Food Allergies – Reducing the Risks

Food allergies can range from merely irritating to life threatening. Approximately 30,000 Americans go to the emergency room each year to be treated for severe food allergies, according to the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network. It is estimated that 150 to 200 Americans die each year because of allergic reactions to food.

Read More

 

Does Your Job Make You Itch and Wheeze?

Occupational contact dermatitis and asthma are two of the most common work-related health issues facing workers worldwide, according to experts presenting the latest research at the 2009 Annual Meeting of the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

Read More

 

Pollen, Pollen Everywhere!

by David Shulan, MD, FAAAAI

For people with seasonal allergies, pollen levels can be a useful tool. Yet many don’t fully understand what they are and how monitoring pollen levels can help to reduce their symptoms.

Read More

 

Wondering What to Do about Swimmer’s Ear?

Affecting the outer ear, swimmer’s ear is a pain-causing condition resulting from inflammation, irritation, or infection. These symptoms occur when water gets trapped in your ear, allowing bacteria to spread, causing a painful sensation. Because this condition commonly affects swimmers, it is known as swimmer’s ear. Swimmer’s ear affects mostly children and teenagers, but can also affect those with eczema (a condition that causes the skin to itch) or excess earwax.

Read More

 

Page 9 of 10 ‹ First  < 7 8 9 10 >